CCTV Inspection and Cleaning is the definitive method of identifying defects in existing sanitary and storm sewer systems.

CCTV INSPECTION


CCTV INSPECTION AND CLEANING

Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) is the definitive method of identifying defects in existing sanitary and storm sewer systems. This technology allows CaJenn to insert the camera into the existing sewer line, through the sewer manhole, tethered to the CCTV van by a coaxial cable. This cable transfers the images from the camera to the CCTV van in real time. In the CCTV van, the CCTV operator can adjust the brightness of the lighting, the speed of the camera moving through the line, the position of the camera lens and many other aspects of the apparatus.

The CCTV operator moves the camera through the line and stops to inspect any defects or other features seen in the sewer line. Our operators have been trained through NASSCO’s PACP program to insure consistency in recognizing and coding of the defects in the sewer. The operator inputs all of the observations into the computer. Still photos can be made of the defects and posted to the CCTV Inspection Log which will be computer generated at the conclusion of the inspection. The end result is a recorded video of the inspection, photos as necessary of the defects, and a computer generated log that shows the location of each defect in the line. The footage counter automatically records the locations of each defect and other observations while the inspection is ongoing.

 

SANITARY SEWER AND STORM CLEANING PROCESS

In order to produce a comprehensive CCTV inspection of the sanitary or storm sewer system, the system should always be cleaned prior to inspection. Cleaning is required before inspection activities per NASSCO’s PACP protocol. Cleaning the sewers with hydraulically powered equipment guarantees that there is enough water and force applied to the sewer to clean the pipe. Combination vacuum/jetting trucks are used so that the dislodged debris can be retrieved via the vacuum system from the downstream manhole, and not allowed to continue on downstream.

Cleaning of sewers is also important to remove debris, grease, roots and other materials that can lead to backups and overflows. During the cleaning process, protruding taps can also be removed. Manholes used for access for the cleaning process will be cleaned as well. Cleaning is important to maintain the intended flow capacity of the sewers, both sanitary and storm, as they were installed.

CCTV Inspection and Cleaning is the definitive method of identifying defects in existing sanitary and storm sewer systems.

CCTV INSPECTION


CCTV INSPECTION AND CLEANING

Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) is the definitive method of identifying defects in existing sanitary and storm sewer systems. This technology allows CaJenn to insert the camera into the existing sewer line, through the sewer manhole, tethered to the CCTV van by a coaxial cable. This cable transfers the images from the camera to the CCTV van in real time. In the CCTV van, the CCTV operator can adjust the brightness of the lighting, the speed of the camera moving through the line, the position of the camera lens and many other aspects of the apparatus.

The CCTV operator moves the camera through the line and stops to inspect any defects or other features seen in the sewer line. Our operators have been trained through NASSCO’s PACP program to insure consistency in recognizing and coding of the defects in the sewer. The operator inputs all of the observations into the computer. Still photos can be made of the defects and posted to the CCTV Inspection Log which will be computer generated at the conclusion of the inspection. The end result is a recorded video of the inspection, photos as necessary of the defects, and a computer generated log that shows the location of each defect in the line. The footage counter automatically records the locations of each defect and other observations while the inspection is ongoing.

 

SANITARY SEWER AND STORM CLEANING PROCESS

In order to produce a comprehensive CCTV inspection of the sanitary or storm sewer system, the system should always be cleaned prior to inspection. Cleaning is required before inspection activities per NASSCO’s PACP protocol. Cleaning the sewers with hydraulically powered equipment guarantees that there is enough water and force applied to the sewer to clean the pipe. Combination vacuum/jetting trucks are used so that the dislodged debris can be retrieved via the vacuum system from the downstream manhole, and not allowed to continue on downstream.

Cleaning of sewers is also important to remove debris, grease, roots and other materials that can lead to backups and overflows. During the cleaning process, protruding taps can also be removed. Manholes used for access for the cleaning process will be cleaned as well. Cleaning is important to maintain the intended flow capacity of the sewers, both sanitary and storm, as they were installed.